Lumsdale falls in Derbyshire.

Lumsdale Falls in Derbyshire was a place I headed on a beautiful sunny winters day. You can find it here. Not a long drive for me but does take time due to its location. I actually parked in the village of Tansley and walked along the valley to Lumsdale. There are a few parking spaces close to the falls.

As you walk up the path to the falls you come across the most spectacular section first though the path down to them is treacherous when wet. It is not worth the risk unless your photo nutcase. You do get a good view from the main path. The day that I went the flow of water was very good and it was fairly clear. It had been raining heavily a few days before and a lot of the heavy color had gone from the water. My 10 stop nd filter was used to get the effects on the water. The exposure was 20 seconds.   

Lumsdale Falls, Derbyshire.

As you walk up the path there are the ruins of an old mill that worked from the flow of the water. You also come across a small second section of falls which are very pretty. You just have to love the sound of running water, it always gives a buzz. It also makes me feel calm and relaxed.

The top part of the falls is just beautiful. You could sit here and watch the water all day. Again I used the 10 stop nd filter and an exposure of 20 seconds. These long exposures give you a lovely smooth effect on the water. I don’t like the frozen look that fast exposures give but it is each to there own. You make up your own mind for preference. 

Go out and create some great images friends.

Lumsdale Falls, Derbyshire
Upper part of Lumsdale falls.

Plumpton rocks in Yorkshire.

Plumpton rocks in Yorkshire is a beautiful 30 acre parkland. The opening times are limited so it is best to check the web site here if you plan to visit. Plumpton rocks can be found between Wetherby and Harrogate.

It has had a lot of restoration work done in recent years to restore it to its former glories. It does come with great credentials, Queen Mary described it as Heaven on earth and Turner painted it. A recent version of Swallows and Amazons was filmed there. 

Choose from a variety paths to walk. The focus of walking is round the lake. 6400 The lake is man made with a dam at one end. You will walk through woodland and between the impressive grit stone rocks. The rocks around the lake are beautiful and have wonderful names such as Lovers leap and Lions den. Finding your way round the paths seems like walking through a maze. 

Some of the Yew trees growing are just beautiful and seem to grow through any gap in the rocks.

Rather than having too much of a plan, it is best just to go and explore. 

The lake isn’t big but is a beautiful setting and the rocks look magnificent.  Go there for a lovely day out and explore.

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Carding Mill Valley, Shropshire.

Carding Mill Valley in Shropshire is run by the National trust. The Shropshire hills are lovely for walkers. Beautiful heather clad rolling hills. When you arrive you park by the stream.

The path up the valley is rocky so be careful walking. The walk follows the 6490stream  up the valley. As you walk up you will see the small but pretty Lightspout waterfall. It’s a lovely place to take a break. Just be a little careful climbing down to it. There are plenty of big rocks to sit and have a drink from your flask.

From the waterfall you can carry on walking up the valley taking a route to the right or to the left. Either way will take you to the hill tops. There is a big circular route to follow. The walking is fairly easy though obviously you are climbing up.

On a good day the scenery is amazing as you follow the route along the top of the hills. It is worth stopping a couple of times to take in the views.

As you follow the path round it will take you back to the valley past the waterfall. When you get back to the valley there is a cafe waiting for you. Something I like to take advantage of.

The main photo shows the stream that you follow up the valley. I set the camera to f22 to give a large depth of field. You must get as much in focus as possible on a shot like this. Having something to lead the eye and give depth to an image. The stream does this perfectly.  

Pick a lovely day and you will have great experience. Go get some great images. 

carding mill valley, shropshire
Carding Mill Valley.

 

 

Clumber park in Nottighamshire.

I had a lovely afternoon at Clumber Park in Nottinghamshire. It’s a place which I am familiar having visited many times over the years. It is run by the national trust so does cost to get in unless like me you are a member. I do visit many national trust places over a year so it is worth joining. I would encourage anyone to join. 

This particular afternoon was sunny with light clouds and plenty of blue

clumber park
Clumber Park, Notthinghamshire

sky. I decided to walk round the lake. It is an easy walk of about 3 miles and the paths are good and well laid out. The scenery changes a lot due to a mixture of mature woodland and open parkland.  The beautiful bridge here is one that you walk over on the route. With the light as beautiful as it was it gave a wonderful mirror image of the bridge in the lake. 

There is plenty of wildlife to photograph as you walk round the lake. As a result I did stop a couple of times to put the long lens on and photograph a few birds. 

My main aim was to return to the visitor centre before sunset. I wanted to capture the sun setting on the lake. The best laid plans of mice and men!! When I got back I took a few shots as the sun was getting low on the lake. I quickly realized that I was too low down, the sun was setting behind the trees.

I quickly jumped into the car and drove up to the main entrance. It is up on high ground looking down an avenue of trees, not quite the lake I would have liked but a spectacular fiery sky.

Go out and create some great images.  

sunset, clumber park
Sunset at Clumber park.

 

Cauldron falls at West Burton.

The Cauldron Falls at West Burton in Wensleydale, North Yorkshire are very easy to reach. You drive into a small village and park by the green. Be sensible and thoughtful with your parking. North Yorkshire has an abundance of impressive waterfalls and you would need a good holiday here to get round them all.

The falls are part of the Walden Beck which flows down to the River Ure near Aysgarth. 

To get to the falls just walk down through the village along a short path and you reach the falls. 

West Burton Wensleydale
West Burton, Wensleydale.

You reach an old stone bridge first. If the water isn’t flowing too heavy and you are careful you can get down to water level to photograph. It is lovely setting with the waterfall stepped down. There is a narrow ledge to put the tripod on if you like long exposures. It is always my preference with water and worth the time it takes. It is an idyllic setting so there should be no rush to leave.

Just past the bridge is the Cauldron waterfall, it isn’t big but is quite impressive and picturesque.

As always with all waterfalls they are better after some rain. You can get round the back of the fall if the flow isn’t too heavy and you proceed with care. 

If you follow the road down next to Walden Beck there a plenty of spots to stop and photograph. 

For the technical among you I am looking at getting a external mic for my Nikon to add some short videos to the blog. I will add how I go with this in the future. From what I have read the internal mics are just not up to the job. As a result I am at the moment I am studying reviews and studying the technical details of what is required.

Cauldron falls, Wensleydale
Cauldron Falls, Wensleydale.

 

 

 

Walking at Keld in Swaledale.

On a lovely autumn day I decided to do some walking at Keld in Swaledale. When I say walking I mean it fits around the photography. I did some research and came up with a lovely walk taking in a few waterfalls. This area of Swaledale has many to choose from. The walk that I chose is here. I didn’t take in the last falls Kisdon. The photography takes a lot longer than the 10 mins they allow at each fall. I will visit this another day.

The first falls that I visited was Hoggarth’s leap. A lovely multi tiered waterfall.

keld swaledale
Hoggarth’s leap.

It has a large pool in front of it. It is a little limited on where you can photograph from. Definitely worth a visit though.  From here I walked down to Catrake falls. These falls are spectacular but not very good for photography. You cannot get to the bottom of them and the photographs from the top are too limited. Maybe there is a different route here and I will look into it for when I go back.

I will move onto the last part of my walk which is East Gill force. I have done this for reason. You will find out why very soon.  6476The image that I have chosen is where the beck joins the river Swale. It is a beautiful spot which is framed by trees.  I have added two walking poles to my kit and were much needed walking down the path to this fall. I have found the walking poles an invaluable part of my kit. After the accident I had  a while ago they will remain part of my kit.

Visiting Wain Wath Force was the middle section of the walk. The reason for leaving until the end was that I wanted to leave the image to make it the largest image. It is such  well known waterfall. The water flow was quite small. It is set in such spectacular scenery. It is a must if you are in this area of the country. I love the colors of the autumn trees. I have used a 30 second exposure at f22 on the shot to get the smooth look to the water.

Go out into the countryside and see a wonderful world. Go photograph it.

keld swaledale
Wain Wath Force.

 

Aysgarth falls in North Yorkshire.

One of my favorite places to visit is Aysgarth falls in North Yorkshire. When you arrive there are two possibilities for parking. One is near the pub as you arrive at the village. From the park you can walk down the hill to the falls. Your other option  is to drive down the hill over the river Ure to the national parks car park. Whichever park you use easily leads you to a well defined path along by the falls. The path is probably best described as gently undulating and fairly easy walking. You do have to be careful if you go off the path, which was my undoing. I slipped on a rock and fell backwards hurting my back and I have been suffering from sciatica since the visit. Ouch!!!

I do tend to visit Aysgarth after heavy rain for two reasons. The first is obviously there is more water flowing though there is usually a good flow at most times. The second and most important reason is that it does add color to the water. The falls are split into the upper falls, mid falls and the lower falls. The mid falls for photography purposes are too limited for access. There are plenty opportunities for something different with the upper and lower falls.

Not everyone likes the effect that long exposures give you on water. It can look a little like plastic. I love the effect but whether you use it is your choice. Photographing fast flowing water with color in it can look very messy. The long exposure gives you more distinct, cleaner colored lines. Here I used a 10 stop neutral density filter and had an exposure of 15 seconds at f22. The best thing you can do is try different ways and see what you like.

Go out and create some beautiful images.

 

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Gadget technology.

Being of the older generation I tend not to keep up with the latest gadget technology. My photographs are processed on my desktop pc. When I travel I have tended to use to use a laptop but as this was coming to the end of its life I started looking for a new one. Someone mentioned to me that one of the latest tablets may do what I needed. Obviously when travelling this would make life easier. The main reason for it was just to process some RAW files whilst away and put them onto social media. I would leave the bulk of work for when I got home.

After looking at the possibilities I purchased the latest ipad pro. Obviously it could connect via the cameras wi-fi. Using the Nikon WMU app I could view the images I had on the camera and download a couple to process. I have downloaded the Lightroom app to work on the images. It also has the added bonus that when out photographing I can check the images as they are taken. This is such a bonus to me as much of my work is based around long exposures and I can check them easily and quickly. A much better way to work than looking at the back of the camera. The tablet goes with me everywhere now and I wouldn’t be without it.

Enough of the technical side its images that matter. I recently visited one of my favorite spots for  photography, Padley gorge in the Peak district in Derbyshire. A beautiful afternoon with dappled sunlight coming through the trees. A lovely walk through the trees and I settled on a couple of spots to photograph. One where I could do close ups of the water flowing round the rocks but the one chosen for here is from a bit further back. It shows more of the flow of the stream flowing through the rocks with an amzing range of colors.

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Blue is the color.

Blue is the color that I want to talk about in this post. Your images should create an emotional feeling to yourself and the viewer.  Different colors have different emotional effects on us. Blue does have some negative emotions, cold, distant, sadness. It also gives some positive emotions, harmony, faithfulness, confidence. By many people blue is regarded as their favorite color which says so much about it as a color.

I am a big believer in having a feel for an image before raising the camera to the eye. See the image and reflect how it feels in your final image. My photoshop skills are basic but I will happily play with the sliders in Lightroom until I get the image to look and feel how I want. Whatever my end image, it must project my feelings of when I took the picture. However your image finishes do not be frightened to be different. No type of art will be universally liked and it should push peoples emotions.

I was walking round the marina at Riva del Gardo whilst on holiday at Lake Garda in Italy when I spotted this shot. It was a calm peaceful scene, which is how I felt at the time. The haze gave the light an overall blue tone and the scene just had that feeling of harmony. I have increased the blue in Lightroom but hopefully kept the original feeling of the image. The jetty and the island give a sense of scale. The angles of the mountains create harmony.

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Sunrise over Lake Garda.

My new post which is sunrise over Lake Garda in the Italian lakes is really aimed at insomniacs everywhere. I have to admit that I tend to take more sunrise shots than sunsets. The reason for this is I like to be in bed early but up and about early so I have lots of sunrise shots and only take sunsets in autumn and winter when the it gets dark early. There are probably many out there who work the other way round but the advice is the same. With this shot I was waiting for the sun to appear over the mountains and I knew it would glisten on the water.

As with most landscape shots I used f22 for the depth of field. Really what my advice in shots like this is to take notice of the light which you should always do as a photographer. Take notice of what is reflected on the water, there will be more than your eyes can take in, you can pick this up later in post production. Experiment and see how you like the image. Remember that you should be creating an image rather than just recording so make the image something that you like.  Just be wary that the sun isn’t too bright and you damage your eyes looking through the viewfinder. Use your live view facility on your camera the sun is too bright.  As a photographer or artist then train your eyes to see the light.

If you would like a trip to Lake Garda then I can highly recommend it. Not only are there some beautiful places on the lake but the Dolomites, Venice and Verona are only a day trip away.

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