Sunset at Yeadon tarn.

Yeadon Tarn.
Yeadon Tarn.

It was forecast for a lovely day so I decided to try capture a lovely sunset at Yeadon Tarn. It is in North Leeds in Yorkshire. I knew of it through a friend. She lives close to it and photographs it regularly so I knew you could get great shots there. 

I had spent most of the day out walking on Ilkley moor and decided to call at Yeadon tarn on the way back home. Arrive about a hour before sunset, this will allow a variety of shots as the sun was setting.

It is a small lake used for sailing and many people walk round the lake. It is on high ground so you do capture the sun setting low over it. There is an airport close by so expect a few planes landing and taking off.

There is a decent car park. The path round the tarn is good and walking is easy. The sun was setting over the sailing part of the tarn so I did stay towards the far end to photograph into the sun.

As with most landscape shots you should use a small aperture f16 to f22. You should have some foreground detail to give depth to the image. You should focus on this detail and have enough depth of field to keep the sky sharp.  Use a tripod if you have too a slow shutter speed for hand holding. My favourite 2 stop graduated neutral density filter was used to get better detail in the sky.

yeadon tarn, Yorkshire
Yeadon Tarn

 

Plumpton rocks in Yorkshire.

Plumpton rocks in Yorkshire is a beautiful 30 acre parkland. The opening times are limited so it is best to check the web site here if you plan to visit. Plumpton rocks can be found between Wetherby and Harrogate.

It has had a lot of restoration work done in recent years to restore it to its former glories. It does come with great credentials, Queen Mary described it as Heaven on earth and Turner painted it. A recent version of Swallows and Amazons was filmed there. 

Choose from a variety paths to walk. The focus of walking is round the lake. 6400 The lake is man made with a dam at one end. You will walk through woodland and between the impressive grit stone rocks. The rocks around the lake are beautiful and have wonderful names such as Lovers leap and Lions den. Finding your way round the paths seems like walking through a maze. 

Some of the Yew trees growing are just beautiful and seem to grow through any gap in the rocks.

Rather than having too much of a plan, it is best just to go and explore. 

The lake isn’t big but is a beautiful setting and the rocks look magnificent.  Go there for a lovely day out and explore.

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Bronte country near Haworth.

Bronte country near Haworth is one place that should inspire your creativity. Some of the worlds greatest literature was written and inspired by this area. Charlotte, Emily and Anne Bronte certainly left their mark on the literary world. A map of the area is here

I wanted to make a good walk so parked up in Howarth and walked to the falls. There are places to park nearer if you don’t want to walk too far. There are plenty of tourist attractions in Howarth about the Bronte family. My main focus was to get to the waterfalls. 

The walk takes you through the village, along a path at the side of the

Bronte, waterfalls
Bronte country.

road. After about a mile you join a track. It’s a good walking track. You follow the path past the Lower Laithe reservoir, across beautiful moorland to  the falls. It is classed as an area on outstanding natural beauty. You can see why when you look at the views. 

When you arrive at South Dean Beck there is small bridge. This is known as the Bronte bridge. It was rebuilt a few years ago after being destroyed by flash floods. 

The fist image is of the small falls to the left as you approach the bridge. The water cascades down the beck. I used a long exposure on the shot to get that smooth feeling in the water. 

The falls themselves are not spectacular but in beautiful surroundings. The second shot is another long exposure shot. It gave me that smooth water with the sky reflected in the water. It does the image a great feeling of depth to the image.

Be inspired and pay this area a visit, you won’t be disappointed. 

Bronte, Haworth
South Dean Beck.

 

 

 

 

Cauldron falls at West Burton.

The Cauldron Falls at West Burton in Wensleydale, North Yorkshire are very easy to reach. You drive into a small village and park by the green. Be sensible and thoughtful with your parking. North Yorkshire has an abundance of impressive waterfalls and you would need a good holiday here to get round them all.

The falls are part of the Walden Beck which flows down to the River Ure near Aysgarth. 

To get to the falls just walk down through the village along a short path and you reach the falls. 

West Burton Wensleydale
West Burton, Wensleydale.

You reach an old stone bridge first. If the water isn’t flowing too heavy and you are careful you can get down to water level to photograph. It is lovely setting with the waterfall stepped down. There is a narrow ledge to put the tripod on if you like long exposures. It is always my preference with water and worth the time it takes. It is an idyllic setting so there should be no rush to leave.

Just past the bridge is the Cauldron waterfall, it isn’t big but is quite impressive and picturesque.

As always with all waterfalls they are better after some rain. You can get round the back of the fall if the flow isn’t too heavy and you proceed with care. 

If you follow the road down next to Walden Beck there a plenty of spots to stop and photograph. 

For the technical among you I am looking at getting a external mic for my Nikon to add some short videos to the blog. I will add how I go with this in the future. From what I have read the internal mics are just not up to the job. As a result I am at the moment I am studying reviews and studying the technical details of what is required.

Cauldron falls, Wensleydale
Cauldron Falls, Wensleydale.

 

 

 

Walking at Keld in Swaledale.

On a lovely autumn day I decided to do some walking at Keld in Swaledale. When I say walking I mean it fits around the photography. I did some research and came up with a lovely walk taking in a few waterfalls. This area of Swaledale has many to choose from. The walk that I chose is here. I didn’t take in the last falls Kisdon. The photography takes a lot longer than the 10 mins they allow at each fall. I will visit this another day.

The first falls that I visited was Hoggarth’s leap. A lovely multi tiered waterfall.

keld swaledale
Hoggarth’s leap.

It has a large pool in front of it. It is a little limited on where you can photograph from. Definitely worth a visit though.  From here I walked down to Catrake falls. These falls are spectacular but not very good for photography. You cannot get to the bottom of them and the photographs from the top are too limited. Maybe there is a different route here and I will look into it for when I go back.

I will move onto the last part of my walk which is East Gill force. I have done this for reason. You will find out why very soon.  6476The image that I have chosen is where the beck joins the river Swale. It is a beautiful spot which is framed by trees.  I have added two walking poles to my kit and were much needed walking down the path to this fall. I have found the walking poles an invaluable part of my kit. After the accident I had  a while ago they will remain part of my kit.

Visiting Wain Wath Force was the middle section of the walk. The reason for leaving until the end was that I wanted to leave the image to make it the largest image. It is such  well known waterfall. The water flow was quite small. It is set in such spectacular scenery. It is a must if you are in this area of the country. I love the colors of the autumn trees. I have used a 30 second exposure at f22 on the shot to get the smooth look to the water.

Go out into the countryside and see a wonderful world. Go photograph it.

keld swaledale
Wain Wath Force.

 

Taking a walk at Bolton abbey.

A little while ago I went for a walk at Bolton abbey. It is a stunningly beautiful part of the Yorkshire dales. It’s a few miles past Ilkley which is regarded as the gateway to the dales.

I park in the top car park near the village. There is a car park near the river where there is a lovely cafe. The reason for parking a little away is that it gives me a lovely long walk. It goes down through a field. You can walk round the abbey from here.

If you want a good walk then cross the river using the wooden bridge or via the stepping stones. The stepping stones are not the best idea when carrying fancy camera gear.

There is a path which follows the river. As you get into the wooded area it does get a bit steep so you do need some fitness to walk it.

After about a mile you reach a wooden bridge which takes you back over the river. This leads you to the cafe. While you are here stop and have a refreshment break.

From this side of the river you can follow the path. You will walk through the woodland to the Strid. The Strid is a powerful flow of water. The river is forced through a narrow section of rocks. Most of all be wary, it is very dangerous.

You will find photo opportunities all along the walk. Because it is such a lovely destination it does get busy. With a little patience you will get some people free photo’s.

Getting back to the car park is just retracing your steps.

Go out, enjoy our world and take some lovely photo’s.

Bolton abbey, yorkshire

Janets Foss, Malham, Yorkshire.

One lovely day I took a drive to photograph Janets Foss, Malham, Yorkshire. Malham is a rather lovely village in the Yorkshire dales. You can park either in the village or drive up towards Goredale scar and park at the side of the road. Wherever you choose to park, there is a path to follow close to Goredale beck. From either way you will reach Janets Foss.

Foss is used in the UK to mean force but is a Nordic word meaning waterfall. Guess this comes from the times we were overrun by the Vikings.

It is a steady walk but I would recommend a good pair of walking boots. When you reach the waterfall there are limited places to view from. You get more viewpoints if take the footwear off and go paddling. Ok if you don’t mind very cold water.  On a busy day it can be difficult to get a people free photograph. Choose a quiet time if possible. As always with waterfalls it is best to go after rain so you have a good flow of water. It is definitely worth a visit if you are in the area. It is not too far a walk  to Goredale scar from here.

The image itself I would have preferred to be slightly different but will go back at a quieter time to get it just as I want. I prefer a longer exposure than I could get this day. The light was difficult as it was quite contrasty. There was dappled sunlight coming through the trees. I did a little work on it Lightroom to get detail in the shadows. The exposure was 1.5 seconds at f22. Obviously the camera was on the travel tripod and weighted by my camera bag.

Go out and photograph, there is beautiful world out there.

 

janets foss, Malham, Yorkshire

Small sections of the landscape.

Instead of just concentrating on vast vista landscapes. Take some time  to focus in on the smaller sections of the landscape. Small sections of the landscape can represent an area or a season beautifully. When you decide to go out then you should have a plan in your mind of the type of shots you want. Keep the plan flexible. This day I had decided to concentrate on the autumn leaves.

On this particular lovely autumn day I had gone for walk in a local park to take some autumnal photographs. The park was at Nostell priory in Yorkshire. There were plenty of fallen multi coloured leaves on the floor. There was a roughly made bench under the branches of a tree. The scene just looked lovely and so harmonious with the colours. The focus was on the colour of the leaves in the scene so I didn’t need to take in the whole tree. The bench made a nice focal point for the shot. Shots like this look right in flat light which just wouldn’t suit a big landscape.

Keep your eyes open for such shots. They might not the impact of vast landscapes but they are so lovely and remind you of lovely days out.

Get outdoors and see the beautiful world we live in.

 

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Aysgarth falls in North Yorkshire.

One of my favorite places to visit is Aysgarth falls in North Yorkshire. When you arrive there are two possibilities for parking. One is near the pub as you arrive at the village. From the park you can walk down the hill to the falls. Your other option  is to drive down the hill over the river Ure to the national parks car park. Whichever park you use easily leads you to a well defined path along by the falls. The path is probably best described as gently undulating and fairly easy walking. You do have to be careful if you go off the path, which was my undoing. I slipped on a rock and fell backwards hurting my back and I have been suffering from sciatica since the visit. Ouch!!!

I do tend to visit Aysgarth after heavy rain for two reasons. The first is obviously there is more water flowing though there is usually a good flow at most times. The second and most important reason is that it does add color to the water. The falls are split into the upper falls, mid falls and the lower falls. The mid falls for photography purposes are too limited for access. There are plenty opportunities for something different with the upper and lower falls.

Not everyone likes the effect that long exposures give you on water. It can look a little like plastic. I love the effect but whether you use it is your choice. Photographing fast flowing water with color in it can look very messy. The long exposure gives you more distinct, cleaner colored lines. Here I used a 10 stop neutral density filter and had an exposure of 15 seconds at f22. The best thing you can do is try different ways and see what you like.

Go out and create some beautiful images.

 

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The Humber Bridge.

Humber bridge.

After driving for a hour along the motorway I pulled into the country park at Hessle.  There is a short walk from here from where you can view the Humber bridge. The Humber bridge is on the outskirts of Hull in Yorkshire. When it first opened in 1981 it was the longest single span suspension bridge in the world. I started my working life out as an engineer so do love beautiful structures. I find the simplicity of this structure very elegant.

When you go to places like this there limited places that you can shoot. Chances are that most shots have been been done over the years. Coming up with something new is not always easy. The best way is to choose a day when you will get some interesting light. Here a deep blue sky with lovely cloud formations gives a little drama to the image. You could go at sunset or at night to make the shot different. Definitely don’t go for one of those flat grey days.

A graduated nd filter was used to bring out detail in the sky. It would have been nice to have had a wider lens than the 24mm that I was using. I would have got a little more in the frame but as I was limited I chose this composition.  I wanted to show some of the shoreline detail in the image. The reflection of the bridge shows in the water and creates subtle colors changes. I wanted the bridge to fill as much of the frame as possible and make it look dynamic. It would be easy to lose the character of the bridge by photographing it from a more straight on view point.

Go out there and make some photographs.

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